January 27, 2015Feature

Last week we went down to MART in Rathmines to check out the latest exhibition to hit their gallery. The exhibition features 19 artists, all of which gave us a small statement about their work.

HALF is a coming together of some very talented artists, spanning different aesthetic disciplines, and is well worth a visit. It continues Tuesday to Sunday, 1-6pm, until the 31st of January.

Siobhan Kamberos

Siobhan Kamberos

“I’ve been running through a lot of obstacles recently with a lot of change. I want to create a moment of clarity to reflect on where I stand right now. Half way through my year ‘ a view from my window’.”

Jack Wycherley

Jack Wycherley

“I have always been fascinated by dreams and have often spent hours trying to recall them, or indeed analyse them in an attempt to rationalise or learn something from them.

“I found that most people take little notice of their dreams but I decided that I would log the details of each dream I had over a two month period and depending on how vivid or affecting the dream was I would try to capture the essence of these sleep-thoughts by making dream prints.”

Conor Coughlan

“I’m currently a second year student in NCAD studying metalwork and jewellery this geometric head is a study of geometric shapes and planes which will be made from sheet metal next.”

 

Stephen Burke

Stephen Burke

“I’m intrigued in primitive art and mark making and the abstract notions which can be taken from them.

“This work is a visual response to the Charlemont flats in Dublin 2. A once effervescent community is now almost mute due to the demolition of homes and the relocation of people. I’ve used text and marks scrawled on the front doors of ex-homes and altered them into contemporary images through the use of screen print and etching.”

Chloe Nagle (Background)

Chloe Nagle

“The investigative work of Chloe Nagle is largely concerned with decay, deterioration and change in object status. Moving through iterative cycles of surface documentation, replication, interference and creation, she probes the nature of change in the aesthetic status of objects that have been drained of their initial, preconceived function: when an object is devoid of function, we are required to view it in aesthetic terms.

“She has placed particular focus on defunct objects and spaces that appear to be poised between destruction and reparation.

Lorcan Murphy Gilligan

Lorcan Murphy Gilligan

“I try and discuss man’s relationship with machine, focusing particularly and on our aimless persistence to create the unnecessary. Investigating this constant compulsion to simplify, and its effect on our creative output.”

Aoife Slevin

Aoife Slevin

“Half Alive. The work of Aoife Slevin is embodied in a material response to the mass consumption and flow of urban existence. It is an exploration into the materials of excess and the imprint of the living space that they retain.

“Monotony, accumulation and unconscious repetitive behaviour in a city space are concepts that are at the essence of her work.”

Fiachra Corcoran

Fiachra Corcoran

“An experimental work to explore ideas of exchange in the gallery space.”

Orla Langton

Orla Langton

“I’m interested in what makes people uncomfortable. I think embarrassment is the most honest emotion. It isn’t always immediate, through scrutiny we can change memories.”

Jordan McQuaid and Ruaidhri Kelly

Jordan McQuaid and Ruaidhri Kelly

“We’re looking at the role of an artist and the perceived notions of how they operate or produce work on a daily basis.

“We’ve transformed part of the gallery into a hidden office space and drawn up a temporary employment contract with the gallery for the duration of the exhibition, working 9 to 5 in our office thereby converting the gallery from a space for viewing into an area for regimented and systematic production.”

Brendan Conroy

Brendan Conroy

“‘Six things and a pun’ is an investigation into often unwanted advice, six simple line drawings are set against a ridiculous pun and a toy parrot”

Aine Mc Bride

Aine Mc Bride

“These are three standing forms constructed of found material. They are flags for materiality and intuitive making. They are signposts to a place as yet undiscovered.

Joshua Reynolds (Work on back wall)

Joshua Reynolds

“20 year old studying metal work and jewellery. My main piece, “eclipse” was constructed from a series of domed copper and is to resemble a solar system. The other two on either side where originally brooches but used a wall pieces for this exhibition.”

Zoe Sheehy

Zoe Sheehy

“I studied media for two years and currently in second year studying Print in NCAD. I was looking at how people are constantly distracted by media and technology.”

Grace Kristensen

Grace Kristensen

“One only has to look at the simplest object and look again to see limitless shapes and form. The possibilities are infinite, even within one colour – white. I enjoyed the subtle differences you can achieve with a change of shade, and how it emulates the subtle differences in form.”

Fiachra Corr

Fiachra Corr

“The piece is a comment on exterior similarities of father and son and a question of the old adage/cliché: like father, like son.”

Mark O’Gorman (Furthest work)

Mark O’Gorman

“The prints i put forward for this exhibition deal with isolation of the mental state and how the brain maybe screaming out for help but the physical state shows no signs of this blending into the crowd. In two of my prints there is a figure screaming out for help, this refers to the mental state of the figure not the physical. I also use a lot of repetition through line and colour to capture movement and action in my work.”

Fiachra Smith

“I was interested in exploring different depictions of myself and how they alter with time, so instead of changing the actual impression of myself I decided to slightly alter the camera viewpoint and use an image from each photo over a short period of time and create an image based on those results.”