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Last night Boiler Room London was set alight by the Guernsey native’s live instrumentation alongside a vibrant crowd and a glittering selection of guest vocalists including Bonzai, 67 and NAO who all chipped in to provide us with the ultimate exclamation mark on what has been one of the most eagerly anticipated albums of the year.

With news breaking last night that Soundcloud only has an estimated 50 days left in existence, Mura Masa could well be one of the last Soundcloud stars that broke through the mainstream barrier. The 45 minute, 13 track body of work has had most of its content already exposed to the public via a number of stuttered releases in the lead up, however we’re left with a handful of new releases including funky number ‘NOTHING ELSE!’ featuring Jamie Lidell, all-encompassing instrumental ‘Messy Love’ and the tangible ‘Who is it Gonna B’ with A.K. Paul.

We’re left off on a poignant note with the weighted, Damon Albarn-featuring number ‘Blu’, despite the rest of the album having a noticeable colourful and upbeat vibe via contributions from tom Tripp and the aforementioned Bonzai and NAO.

The self-titled album is a sort of chrysalis for the 20 year-old, with the number of vocal contributions growing exponentially since his first mixtape ‘Soundtrack to a Death’ along with the versatility of his instrumentals.

His work with bonafide superstars like A$AP Rocky, Desiigner and Charli XCX have catapulted his sound to the radio, immediately placing him in an upper echelon in comparison to similarly-styled alt producers such as SG Lewis, Tom Misch and more have yet to rival Mura Masa’s exposure, sort of making comparisons between them somewhat obsolete.

This begs the question whether at the age of 20 Mura Masa can avoid the draw of cheap Pop production and continue to produce some of the most uniquely accessible music we’ve seen in recent years or if he’ll fall into the endless pit of talented producers wasted on the scrapheap of full-blown mainstream music.

With that being said, the imminent demise of Soundcloud pushes the Underground to more recognisable streaming services, which will ultimately lead to a clearer exposure of alternative music meaning the gap between it and chart music could really begin to narrow, given the shift in power between radio and streaming services.

Keeping in line with his music up until now, Mura Masa remains unpredictable, meaning for now we should probably sit tight and appreciate what he’s given us to date, not only the album, but the alternative versions, remixes and instrumentals that were dropped in the meantime also.

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