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The new track is the final offering from the ‘Cacoon’ series and to celebrate we had Nealo talk to Malaki about the nights out he’ll never forget.

Since bursting onto the scene with his emphatic ‘Call Us By Our Names’ last year, Malaki has continued experimenting with different styles and has chopped it up with some of the most exciting artists in Ireland.

Emerging initially with a reflective and vulnerable debut EP ‘Butterfly Boy’, the Dublin spitter took a more collaborative and freewheeling approach in his latest body of work the ‘Cacoon’ project.

Created in lockdown, he’s released a song from the project every two weeks featuring cover art from a different artist and a feature from a different act. The final track from the record ‘Glory Daze’ was produced by close friend and frequent collaborator Matthew Harris and dropped today along with a feature from another Irish artist in the ascendancy – Nealo.

The new cut reflects the gaff parties and nightlife that are an essential lifeblood of the capital. Weighing up both the good and the bad in those late-night experiences, it’s arguably the most thoughtful songs on the project.

Ahead of the release, we had Malaki chat to Nealo over text about the nights that have stayed in his memory.

Malaki:
What’s some of your favourite places to go out drinking in Dublin?

Nealo:
My two favourite places are:

Bowes on Fleet Street -it’s a real old man pub with the best pint of Guinness in Dublin and I’ll fight any man, woman or child who tells me Grogans has a better pint.

Fibbers – For me just for the memories. We played so many incredible gigs there over the years that it just oozes good times for me.

Sorry if my answers are sporadic for the next 15 minutes my young fella is after waking up.

Malaki:
Lovely stuff! Kinda answers my second question of what are some places that hold the most memories, but may as well ask was there any particular memory or night out that you hold tight?

Nealo:
Right man, sorry I’m back. This shit is never-ending haha. Sometimes at Christmas all my friends that have emigrated come home and we have an unholy night out in town. Those are some of the best memories I have.

Malaki:
Is there any places you miss that are no longer there?

Nealo:
Yeah, absolutely man. there was a place called Eamon Dorans. It used to be where literally every punk and hardcore band from around the world would come and play. I probably played 100 gigs there over the years. I really miss that place.

malaki ellius grace

Malaki:
What was the first bar you ever went to in Dublin?

Nealo:
It was The International. I was 14 and still wearing a suit from my grandad’s funeral. I couldn’t believe I was getting served pints.

Malaki:
Hahaha That’s incredible. The song talks a lot about the regrets of some nights do you think you regretted some of your crazy nights out?

Nealo:
I don’t regret the nights or the time spent cause it was all beautiful. But there are some days when I’m feeling really low and I do think what affect those substances had on my brain in the long term. I was never a fan of cocaine, but MD I loved. It’s an incredible drug which is why they are now using it for therapy around the world, but if you abuse it the downsides are major.

malaki ellius grace1

Malaki:
Last but not least, what’s your favourite night out you’ve ever had and why?

Nealo:
I think you already asked me something similar like is there a memory you hold dear of a night out. There’s nothing really they all just blur into one big happy time to be honest. It’s ongoing as well. I’d like to think that my favourite night out is still ahead of me.

Malaki:
Sorry probably did, I’ll ask one more then. How did you interpret the song at first listen?

Nealo:
As soon as I heard you mention Ketamine I was like “Oh it’s about the sesh”.

I think you did a really good job at describing that feeling of joyful uncertainty that comes with a rager of a party. I’m really happy you asked me to be a part of it.

You should be a poet or a rapper or something.

Malaki:
Legend. Thank you my man, pleasure.

Photos: Header image, Ellius Grace & Bobby Zithelo // All other images – Ellius Grace. 

Words: Dylan Murphy 
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